PLR Optics 58MM +1 +2 +4 +10 Close-Up Macro Filter Set with Pouch For The Canon Digital EOS Rebel SL1 (100D), T5i (700D), T4i (650D), T3 (1100D), T3i (600D), T1i (500D), T2i (550D), XSI (450D), XS (1000D), XTI (400D), XT (350D), 60D, 60Da, 1D C, 50D, 40D, 30D, 20D, 10D, 5D, 1D X, 1D, 5D Mark 2, 5D Mark 3, 7D, 6D SLR Cameras Which Has Any Of These (18-55mm, 75-300mm, 50mm 1.4 , 55-200) Canon Lenses

Canon EOS-1D C

Backed with a PLR 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.

PLR filters continue the brand’s long legacy of superior optical solutions. All our filters are carefully formulated to ensure consistent color and accuracy throughout the entire surface of the glass. Why? Consistent color means consistent high quality results. We know that a poorly made filter makes a great lens and camera worthless, that’s why the our frame rings are constructed of special alloys that won’t expand or contract over time or due to temperature extremes-it’s also why we back our filters with an 10 year warranty-because we engineer them to last.

Like all PLR optics, PLR filters are precision manufactured to the most demanding of tolerances. This ensures consistent high quality results even after years of use.

PLR Optics 58MM +1 +2 +4 +10 Close-Up Macro Filter Set with Pouch For The Canon Digital EOS Rebel SL1 (100D), T5i (700D), T4i (650D), T3 (1100D), T3i (600D), T1i (500D), T2i (550D), XSI (450D), XS (1000D), XTI (400D), XT (350D), 60D, 60Da, 1D C, 50D, 40D, 30D, 20D, 10D, 5D, 1D X, 1D, 5D Mark 2, 5D Mark 3, 7D, 6D SLR Cameras Which Has Any Of These (18-55mm, 75-300mm, 50mm 1.4 , 55-200) Canon Lenses

Features PLR Optics 58MM +1 +2 +4 +10 Close-Up Macro Filter Set with Pouch For The Canon Digital EOS Rebel SL1 (100D), T5i (700D), T4i (650D), T3 (1100D), T3i (600D), T1i (500D), T2i (550D), XSI (450D), XS (1000D), XTI (400D), XT (350D), 60D, 60Da, 1D C, 50D, 40D, 30D, 20D, 10D, 5D, 1D X, 1D, 5D Mark 2, 5D Mark 3, 7D, 6D SLR Cameras Which Has Any Of These (18-55mm, 75-300mm, 50mm 1.4 , 55-200) Canon Lenses

Overall Rating: Rating=4.5
(Full Reviews Product)

List Price: $ 13.99
Sale Price: $ 13.99

This Product is available at AMAZON for the best Price

PLR Optics 58MM +1 +2 +4 +10 Close-Up Macro Filter Set with Pouch For The Canon Digital EOS Rebel SL1 (100D), T5i (700D), T4i (650D), T3 (1100D), T3i (600D), T1i (500D), T2i (550D), XSI (450D), XS (1000D), XTI (400D), XT (350D), 60D, 60Da, 1D C, 50D, 40D, 30D, 20D, 10D, 5D, 1D X, 1D, 5D Mark 2, 5D Mark 3, 7D, 6D SLR Cameras Which Has Any Of These (18-55mm, 75-300mm, 50mm 1.4 , 55-200) Canon Lenses

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Comments

  1. Franklin J. Rabon "music/photography enthusiast" says:
    233 of 236 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Great for the money, but don’t expect miracles, November 3, 2011
    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    I occasionally dabble in macro, but nowhere near enough to justify the outrageous sums dedicated macro lenses go for. So, I thought I’d pick these up.

    First, a nice bonus was that it comes with a compact filter case with 4 lens slots. I ordered this product without realizing it came with that, so that was quite the pleasant surprise, as it’s actually a pretty nice, albeit small, filter case. I actually connect the 1 to the 2 and the 4 to the 10 when I store them, opening up two slots, which allows me to carry a UV filter and a polarizing filter as well. Which is really nice when I’m just carrying a small camera bag to not need two separate filter cases. The lens cloth is reasonably good.

    On to the actual filters. If you go into them with reasonable expectations, it’s hard to be disappointed with them. Attaching them to my 55-200 nikkor telephoto lens results in pretty good, pretty sharp pictures. The more you stack them, the more your image will degrade, but you can still get reasonably decent images even with all four stacked. if you stack, stack from most magnification closest to the lens to weakest magnification furthest from your lens, otherwise your focus and depth of field will go crazy and you’ll get all kinds of weird aberrations in your image). Also, make sure you regularly clean them, as any smudges or dust will, shockingly, get magnified.

    Be aware that these will make your camera have a difficult time autofocusing, as the computer has no idea that these things are on the end of the lens, and thus its normal tricks don’t work as well. However, if you’re doing macro, you want to use manual focus anyway, even if you have a dedicated macro lens you want to use manual focus, so that’s not really a negative in my eyes.

    Also, be aware that like any macro filters, they reduce depth of field, meaning you’ll want to shoot with as high of a number f stop as possible (that is your aperture as small as possible, high f/stop = low aperture), otherwise you’ll find yourself with a depth of field that can only be measured in milimieters (literally, with a small (wide open) f stop, and all four stacked, your depth of field will be less than a about a half millimeter!)

    Also, be aware that since things are magnified here, that any camera shake is magnified as well. Meaning that you’ll want to use a tripod if at all possible. You can occasionally get good results hand shooting, but you’ll get more consistently sharp results with a tripod. And a tripod will also be beneficial because, due to the high f/stop you’ll need to get the depth of field you’ll want, you may need both a high ISO and a long shutter speed.

    If you buy these thinking you can just throw them on the end of your kit lens, use autofocus and BAM, get pro level macro photos, you’ll be pretty unhappy. BUt if you know what you’re buying, they’re a pretty outstanding little set. I almost gave these 5 stars, because they’re a great value, and you really can’t expect anything more than what they give you from any macro filters, regardless of price. However, I didn’t want to mislead. If macro photography is your thing you WILL need a macro lens to get the type of sharpness that field really demands. If you just occasionally dabble in macro when you happen across something interesting, they really are hard to beat.

    edit: I think a lot of people newer to macro photography try these out, and thus, I see that a lot of reviews are complaining about things that don’t really have anything to do with these filters, but just have to do with macro photography. Three complaints stand out as being complaints about macro photography more than these filters:

    First, when you’re zoomed in and magnified this much, you HAVE to shoot from a tripod. Any camera shake is going to be magnified. SO, I think a lot of the ‘blurry’ complaints stem from people trying ot use these handheld. Don’t bother with macro if you aren’t going to shoot with a tripod and a trigger release (remote control shutter button) or a timer.

    Second, don’t shoot macro on autofocus. autofocus isn’t made for macrophotography. It has nothing to do with these filters. The camera just gets really confused by macro photography. Even a dedicated macro lens will only get you roughly in the ball park focus wise, and many of the best macro lenses don’t autofocus at all. If you’re going to do macro, then you need to use manual focus.

    Third, your subjects need to be relatively still. Because macro involves relatively long shutter speeds, you’ll need to shoot still subjects. Or at the very least, take a ton of shots and hope that the object stayed still in a few of them. Again, this has nothing to do with these filters, that’s just the way macro photography is.

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  2. bmillar says:
    55 of 57 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    cheap, but polarizer is no good, June 2, 2011
    By 
    bmillar

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    The main reason I bought these was because I wanted something to protect my lens. The UV filter does exactly that. Under certain lighting conditions it puts artifacts on my pictures, but that doesn’t bother me because I expect some of that from cheap glass. Also, I knew beforehand that I would probably never find use for the fluorescent filter.

    I was excited about the prospect of the polorizer though. I took it out for a test drive when my kids were playing in a waterfall on a sunny day. Perfect opportunity to get rid of glare off the water. As far as removing glare, it worked great. The problem is that while it removes glare, it blurs the image significantly. It’s not even a subtle softening. Every picture that had this filter came out blurry. I did test shots on a tripod with a ton of different lighting conditions and every picture came out the same. Nothing in focus.

    Oh well. I don’t feel ripped off because I got one protective filter and two trash filters for the same price that I could have gotten one cheap protective filter. If I smashed my uv filter, I might consider buying this again because of the price, but overall, if you are looking for a polarizer, don’t get this.

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  3. S. CUSTOMER "Sufficeth" says:
    39 of 40 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Great!, July 8, 2012
    By 
    S. CUSTOMER “Sufficeth” (Pennsylvania) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: PLR Optics 58MM +1 +2 +4 +10 Close-Up Macro Filter Set with Pouch For The Canon Digital EOS Rebel SL1 (100D), T5i (700D), T4i (650D), T3 (1100D), T3i (600D), T1i (500D), T2i (550D), XSI (450D), XS (1000D), XTI (400D), XT (350D), 60D, 60Da, 1D C, 50D, 40D, 30D, 20D, 10D, 5D, 1D X, 1D, 5D Mark 2, 5D Mark 3, 7D, 6D SLR Cameras Which Has Any Of These (18-55mm, 75-300mm, 50mm 1.4 , 55-200) Canon Lenses (Electronics)

    I just take photos for fun and was looking for a cheap way to get really close up shots without having to crop my images. I looked at extender tubes and weighed the pros and cons and decided that filters were a better fit for my needs.

    Once you find the “sweet spot” of each filter, it takes pretty decent photos. It was a cheap way to make my dslr take super close up photos. With these, you should use the smallest aperture possible or expect a small depth of field. The filters give a nice background blur to anything behind the object. Anytime you put another piece of glass in front of your lens, you should expect a little distortion. I’ll post some photos I took to make it easy for people to see if the distortion is too much for their needs or not.

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