Roxio Easy VHS to DVD for Mac

Composite RCA S-Video Stereo Audio

Roxio Easy VHS to DVD for Mac includes everything you need to easily transfer video from VHS Hi8 V8 or analog camcorders to DVD. Perfect for digitizing and protecting home videos on outdated media. Easy VHS to DVD for Mac supports most analog camcorders VCRs and even DVD players. Capture video at full DVD-quality resolution. Add Hollywood style menus and chapters for impressive results. Edit your captured movies in iMovie to add titles transitions and other edits. Great for transferring videos to iPod or PSP too! Post finished videos to YouTube or your favorite social working sites. Content: Roxio Video Capture USB hardware USB extension cable Video Inputs: Composite video (RCA) and S-Video (mini-DIN) Audio Inputs: Stereo audio (RCA) System Requirements:Macintosh puter with a Dual Processor PowerPC G5 or Intel processor DVD recordable drive for DVD-Video creation Mac OS X 10.4 or 10.5 512MB RAM 15GB free hard disk space remended Available USB 2.0 port iMovie HD ’08 or ’09 Format: MAC 10.4 OR LATER Genre: PRODUCTIVITY Age: 815227009220 UPC: 815227009220 Manufacturer No: 243100Roxio Easy VHS to DVD for Mac includes everything you need to easily transfer video from VHS, Hi8, V8 or analog camcorders to DVD. Perfect for digitizing and protecting home videos on outdated media. Easy VHS to DVD for Mac supports most analog camcorders, VCRs and even DVD players. Capture video at full DVD-quality resolution. Add Hollywood style menus and chapters for impressive results. Edit your captured movies in iMovie to add titles, transitions and other edits. Great for transferring videos to iPod or PSP too! Post finished videos to YouTube or your favorite social networking sites.

The fastest way to convert your analog home video to digital. Click to enlarge.

Connect composite video (RCA) and S-Video (mini-DIN) devices. Click to enlarge.

Import stereo audio (RCA). Click to enlarge.

Supports most analog camcorders, VCRs and even DVD players. Click to enlarge.

Post videos to YouTube; create VCDs, SVCDs and DVDs; and more. Click to enlarge.

Everything you need to make DVDs from your VHS and camcorder tapes!

It’s a sad fact that VHS, Hi8 and Video8 tapes degrade over time, eventually losing their original quality. Don’t let your memories fade away! Now you can digitally preserve your precious memories for generations to come.

  • Easily capture video from your VCR or analog camcorder
  • Burn captured videos to DVD with professionally designed menu styles
  • Import into iMovie to add effects and edit your video
  • Transfer your videos to an iPod, iPhone or other device

Step One: Connect your VHS player or camcorder to the included capture device using RCA cables

Step Two: Connect the capture device to your Mac’s USB port

Step Three: Capture and share on DVD, portable devices or online

Capture

  • Transfer video from your VCR to DVD in just a few clicks–the fastest way to convert your analog home video to digital
  • Capture video from VCRs and directly from other analog sources including Hi8, Video8 camcorders

Create

  • Create VCD, SVCD and DVD movies from your own video
  • Edit your captured movies in iMovie to add titles, transitions and other edits
  • Choose from professional designed menu styles to enhance your created DVD

Share

  • Post video to YouTube or your favorite social networking sites
  • Convert video files to play on most popular mobile devices including iPod, iPhone and Sony PSP

Contents

Installation CD

  • Easy VHS to DVD Capture software

Roxio Video Capture USB hardware

  • USB extension cable
  • Video Inputs: Composite video (RCA) and S-Video (mini-DIN)
  • Audio Inputs: Stereo audio (RCA)

Support

  • For Roxio Easy VHS to DVD for Mac support, tips, and tricks, go to www.roxio.com/enu/support/easy-vhs-to-dvd-mac/default.html

Roxio Easy VHS to DVD for Mac

Features Roxio Easy VHS to DVD for Mac

  • Roxio Easy VHS to DVD for Mac lets you easily capture video from your VCR or analog camcorder, to preserve your memories for generations to come
  • Burn captured videos to VCD, SVCD or DVD with professionally designed menu styles
  • Import into iMovie to add effects, titles, transitions and edit your video
  • Transfer your videos to an iPod, iPhone or other device; post on YouTube or your favorite social networking sites
  • Includes capture software and USB hardware with RCA and S-Video inputs
Overall Rating: Rating=4.5
(Full Reviews Product)

List Price: $ 79.95
Sale Price: $ 44.99

This Product is available at AMAZON for the best Price

Roxio Easy VHS to DVD for Mac

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Comments

  1. Derek Bartholomaus says:
    158 of 164 people found the following review helpful
    1.0 out of 5 stars
    Does Not Work With Mac OS 10.6, February 2, 2010
    By 

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Roxio Easy VHS to DVD for Mac (Software)

    I would really like to write a review on how this product works, but I cannot because it does not work with Mac OS 10.6 and it doesn’t tell you anywhere that it doesn’t. I contacted Roxio Support because I could not get audio to be captured and they responded with “Please note that Easy VHS to DVD for Mac is not compatible with OS X 10.6.” I have asked if they plan to support Mac OS 10.6 but they have not replied yet.

    So, if you are using Mac OS 10.6 DO NOT purchase this product at this time.

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  2. Tim E Robertson "Publisher MyMac" says:
    241 of 262 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Larry Grinnell’s [...] Review, August 27, 2009
    By 
    Tim E Robertson “Publisher MyMac” (Battle Creek, Mi United States) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Roxio Easy VHS to DVD for Mac (Software)

    This review could have gone very, very badly, had it not been for Roxio’s excellent support website, and their intrepid PR person, who kept the dialog going when I was ready to wash my hands of the whole thing.

    That said, the last thing I wanted to do was start yet another review with: “I really wanted to like this product, but…”

    Over the last four months, when I unfortunately had a lot of time on my hands (a victim of the current economic unpleasantness, since resolved, and I am again very happily employed), I decided I needed to regain some storage space in my increasingly cramped townhouse. My collection of several hundred VHS tapes had to go. There were, however, 40-50 titles I wanted to keep and decided to put them on DVD. I had planned on doing this almost two years ago, and found a superior (and expensive!) analog to digital video converter, a Canopus ADVC-300, which I was able to find at a very acceptable price on eBay. I set up my VHS deck in my computer room, connected the video and audio outputs to the ADVC-300 inputs, and sent the output to my dual 2.0 GHz Mac G5 tower’s Firewire port (still running Mac OSX 10.4), and into my copy of iMovie HD (from iLife ’06). Each two hour tape took up 25 GB of disk space in the DV file format. I quickly trimmed unwanted video at the start and end, and inserted chapter markers when the tapes had multiple programs, or if I was putting two 1 hour tapes on a single two hour DVD. These chapter markers directly imported into iDVD where I picked a theme, edited the captions, and burned the final DVD. On my G5 tower, the process of rendering two hours of video before the DVD could be burned, took 4-6 hours.

    I repeated this process on my black MacBook with a 2.0 GHz Core2Duo processor, and 3GB of RAM, and everything worked about the same, except the render time took a few hours less, thanks to the speedier processor.

    Mostly, I started the recording process just before I went to bed. The next morning, I spent about 30-45 minutes editing the DV file, pushed it to iDVD, and let it render most of the day. By late afternoon, I had another DVD for my briefly empty shelves. It took about 6 weeks to finish the process and I was able to put all the gear away.

    Enter [...] own John Nemerovski (that’s Nemo to you…) who had heard about my project and thought he had a great review project that was right up my alley. Roxio had just released a Macintosh version of their popular easy VHS to DVD product and was looking for reviewers. In spite of my reputation for writing negative reviews on this site, he gave the job to me anyway…

    I received the package, which contained a CD, Getting Started Guide, a Roxio Video Capture USB Device (the brains of this outfit), a short USB to USB extension cable, and a breakout cable with stereo audio, composite video, and S-Video connectors. The CD contained the easy VHS to DVD for Mac software, as well as a (very) limited-feature version of Toast 9.

    The Roxio Video Capture USB Device looked suspiciously like something from Elgato, makers of a number of magical video products that bring video content into your Mac via the USB 2.0 port. The big difference, however, is the software. The Elgato-branded device outputs MPEG-4 video, while the Roxio device outputs MPEG-2 files (the same format as commercial DVDs).

    I installed the easy VHS to DVD software on my G5 tower, connected the Roxio Video Capture USB Device to the front USB 2.0 port, and connected the audio/video breakout connecting cable to cables from the output of my VHS recorder. When I launched the software, I was immediately directed to Roxio’s website to download and update the software, taking the revision level from version 1.0 to 1.0.1. I went through the easy setup procedure (more on that below), and tried to record some video. At the end of 2 hours, I clicked the stop button, and in the next window, clicked the “Send to iMovie” button. My Mac spent the next two or so hours converting the MPEG-2 file to an intermediate format, but instead of opening the file into iMovie as the instructions suggested they would, I got an error message stating the program could not find the iMovie program. Thinking I’d done something wrong, and tried it again (if I’d been just a little bit smarter, I’d have recorded five minutes of video, and not two hours!), and got the same results. After hunting around the hard drive, I found the MPEG-2 file in the Movies folder at the top level of my home directory. When I opened it in QuickTime Player, I immediately spotted a problem–a massive number of dropped frames. I then checked the size of the file–about 600k–it should have been somewhere around 5.4 GB!

    I repeated the above step with my MacBook, and at least got a 5.4 GB MPEG-2 file with no evidence of dropped frames, but still got the iMovie error. I went to the Roxio support boards (excellent, by the way,…

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